Articles Posted in Criminal Defense

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I simply intend to plead guilty, why do I need a lawyer?”

It may seem that filing a false police report does no harm, but doing so can result in criminal charges in North Carolina. Although the reasons why people make untrue claims to police officers vary, it makes sense that the law does not tolerate false police reports. After all, one of the duties of law enforcement is to take seriously every claim filed by citizens.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “As a parent, what should I be aware of when speaking to police about charges my child faces?”

Landmark Criminal Justice Reform Coming to North Carolina on Dec. 1, 2019

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

A man was arrested in Charlotte and charged with one count of assault with a deadly weapon, but what does it mean in North Carolina?

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I simply intend to plead guilty, why do I need a lawyer?”

The prospect of having to hire a criminal attorney can be terrifying. No one wants to be in a position to have to figure out whether or not they need legal representation. It is one question you never hope to answer, but is also one of those scenarios in which if you have to ask, you probably do.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

As technology advances, so must the law. The problem is that sometimes the law is slow to catch up to technological advances, and it can take even longer for the law to cover each little nuance that might arise. Digital devices, like cell phones and other electronics, are by no means a new development in technology, but there are advances made every day, and these devices become more and more integral to committing crimes. One problem that often arises is issuing a search warrant for an electronic device and the digital contents contained on the device. Courts are left to make a decision on what the requirements are for issuing a search warrant for a digital device and when they are appropriate.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

Police are an integral part of society; they keep the peace, catch criminals, and put their lives at risk to keep the general population safe. Since the police play such a large role in solving crimes and convicting criminals, it is not surprising that police officers are often called to testify during court proceedings. An issue arises with police testimony, however, when the officer testifying was not involved with the incident at all. Instead, that officer is offering an opinion, based off of his or her police experience, as to what happened or would have happened. This practice is controversial because someone without actual knowledge, or only investigative knowledge, of the incident is offering testimony that could sway a jury.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

The Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit recently ruled on a case challenging parking enforcement practices of putting chalk on a vehicle’s tire so that they can keep track of how long a vehicle has been parked in one spot. The court found that marking the tires was a search under the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. This case started in Saginaw, Michigan.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

You have probably heard about “Operation Varsity Blues,” the college admissions scandal that is rocking the nation. Evidence of parents cheating, lying, and bribing their children’s ways into top-level schools around the country has taken the news cycle by storm. The public’s interest in the scandal lies partly with who stands accused of these criminal acts. There are many notable celebrities wrapped up in the scandal. One such celebrity is Lori Loughlin, who played the loveable Aunt Becky in the popular sitcom Full House.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

When facing criminal assault, battery, or any other type of charges, defendants often claim self defense. When claiming self defense, a defendant is stating that the party claiming to be the victim was actually the aggressor or initiated the conflict that resulted in the need for defense of person, family, or home. In order to prove this, evidence needs to be presented that shows the victim was the one who initiated the conflict. In State v. Bass, the North Carolina Supreme Court stipulated types of evidence that are not permissible in self defense cases to prove provocation.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

The criminal court process can be difficult to understand. If you have never been charged with a crime, or even if you have, it can be difficult to determine what the next step should be. However, if you are facing a criminal charge in North Carolina, it is important to know what to expect and the steps that will occur throughout the case. There are two types of criminal charges in North Carolina — misdemeanor and felony charges. Each charge has a different process through the North Carolina criminal court system.