Our office continues to operate during our regular business hours, which are 8:30 am - 5:30 pm, Monday through Friday, but you can call the office 24 hours a day. We continue to follow all recommendations and requirements of the State of Emergency Stay at Home Order. Consultations are available via telephone or by video conference. The safety of our clients and employees is of the utmost importance and, therefore, in-person meetings are not available at this time except for emergencies or absolutely essential legal services.

Articles Posted in Criminal Defense

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I simply intend to plead guilty, why do I need a lawyer?”

Mens Rea, which is Latin for “guilty mind,” is a standard in North Carolina’s criminal cases that helps prevent people from being punished when their intentions were innocent. The concept helps differentiate between an individual who intentionally committed a crime and an individual who did not intend to do it.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Do I need to hire an attorney if I have been falsely accused?”

Being wrongfully accused of a crime you did not commit is a stressful and life-altering experience. The emotional distress associated with being charged with a crime when you are innocent cannot compare to anything else.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “My relationship is ending and they are threatening to call the police, how can I help myself?”

Phone harassment is a serious crime in North Carolina. You can be arrested and charged with a crime for making harassing phone calls, which involves any of the following:

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

The most recent research published on 24/7 Wall St. revealed the most common types of crimes that are being committed in Charlotte and other parts of North Carolina. The study concluded that in 2018, the most recent year for which crime data is available, crime was more common in North Carolina than it was on average across the United States.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Do I need to hire an attorney if I have been falsely accused?”

Conspiracy is defined as an agreement between two or more people to do something unlawful. What penalties can you face for “conspiring” in North Carolina? If you are planning to commit a crime in Charlotte or elsewhere in North Carolina, you can be charged with criminal conspiracy.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

Even if you did not commit a crime, talking to police officers during a traffic stop can be a stressful experience. When police suspect that you have committed a crime, they may want to search your vehicle. However, unless your circumstances meets the criteria that allow police to do a warrantless search, law enforcement officers need your permission to search your vehicle.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

Looting is almost synonymous with protests. This was evident during the recent protests over the killing of a black man in Minneapolis, Minnesota. As reported by Fox News, eight people were charged in connection with looting and trespassing while protesting in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

North Carolina’s state prisons are releasing some inmates out early in an attempt to slow the spread of COVID-19 in prisons. The announcement was made by the state’s corrections officials, according to the Charlotte Observer.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

U.S. Department of Justice warned that those who intentionally spread coronavirus (COVID-19) would be charged with terrorism. A CNN report cited a DOJ memorandum that warned individuals against purposefully spreading COVID-19. A person could be charged with terrorism for coughing on other people or groceries or for other forms of the “purposeful exposure and infection of others,” the memo, which was sent to federal law enforcement agencies and attorneys.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

As North Carolina residents were ordered to stay home from March 30 due to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), some of you might wonder, “Does it mean that people will commit more crimes?” or, on the contrary, can it lead to a reduction in violent crimes and other crimes?

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