Articles Tagged with Felony

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

North Carolina law recognizes theft as taking someone else’s property without their permission to permanently deprive the owner of the item. Theft, burglary, and shoplifting are serious crimes. Being charged with one of these crimes carries the risk of losing your freedom and facing other life-changing consequences.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

Air travel is supposed to be an enjoyable and convenient experience, but that is not the case for everyone. Assaulting, hitting, threatening, or interfering with crewmembers aboard an airplane can get you into trouble with the law.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

Lawmakers in North Carolina’s State Senate and House of Representatives – both controlled by Republicans – have unanimously approved a bill to overhaul the state’s outdated sexual assault laws.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I simply intend to plead guilty, why do I need a lawyer?”

It may seem that filing a false police report does no harm, but doing so can result in criminal charges in North Carolina. Although the reasons why people make untrue claims to police officers vary, it makes sense that the law does not tolerate false police reports. After all, one of the duties of law enforcement is to take seriously every claim filed by citizens.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

It is not surprising that minors and adults are treated differently under the law when it comes to committing crimes. Minors are still learning and growing into adults and often face less stringent repercussions for committing, or being accused of a crime than an adult committing the same crime. This begs the question, who is considered a minor for crimes committed in North Carolina? Is there always a strict age defining a minor, or can the age of minority shift depending on the crime?

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “How is getting charged with a crime on a college campus different from being charged off campus?”

As society evolves and changes, the laws that govern us also need to evolve. A hot button topic in politics right now is updating existing drug laws and their sentences. A North Carolina state senator has introduced a bill to the North Carolina Senate that would decriminalize the possession of marijuana for up to three ounces. A similar version to this bill was introduced about a year ago, but that proposed possession limit was increased to four ounces.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I simply intend to plead guilty, why do I need a lawyer?”

A new bill was introduced in the North Carolina House of Representatives that would permit domestic violence offenders to be tracked via GPS. The plan is to have a pilot program and test using GPS to track domestic violence offenders before opening up the program to more counties and eventually the entire state. The bill proposes looking at a variety of factors to determine:

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

The criminal court process can be difficult to understand. If you have never been charged with a crime, or even if you have, it can be difficult to determine what the next step should be. However, if you are facing a criminal charge in North Carolina, it is important to know what to expect and the steps that will occur throughout the case. There are two types of criminal charges in North Carolina — misdemeanor and felony charges. Each charge has a different process through the North Carolina criminal court system.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “The person that called the police doesn’t want to press charges, can I still be prosecuted?”

The prospect of facing criminal charges can lead to anxiety and uncertainty, regardless if the crime is a felony or a misdemeanor. You might think that the only possible outcome is being found guilty or innocent. However, in North Carolina there are additional results for criminal charges. It is important to note that there is no guarantee of any outcome in a criminal charge. Instead, it is helpful to know all of the possible outcomes for your case. Criminal convictions can have life-altering consequences that follow you for years to come. The following are alternatives to a finding of guilt or innocence in a criminal charge.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I simply intend to plead guilty, why do I need a lawyer?”

If you watch a television drama that follows the story of a crime and its prosecution, it seems like a quick process. A crime is committed, suspects are identified, a suspect is charged, the court hears the case, and an outcome is decided. Reality is not like television. Sometimes it takes days, months, or even years to determine who committed a crime. Is there a time limit for bringing about a charge on a suspect? Or can charges be brought anytime after the crime was committed and a suspect was found? The answer to those questions vary from state to state, but in North Carolina it depends on whether the crime was a misdemeanor or a felony.