Articles Tagged with arrested

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Is there more than one way for police to charge a person with DWI?”

Some people assume that you can be charged with driving while intoxicated (DWI) only when you are impaired by alcohol. In reality, however, you can be arrested for operating a vehicle while impaired by marijuana or any other impairing substance (N.C.G.S. § 20-138.1).

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “When can I post on Social media about my ongoing case?”

The vast majority of American adults use at least one social media platform every single day. However, did you know that your social media use could potentially be used against you in a criminal case?

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

Several cities in North Carolina enacted a curfew in response to protests over the killing of George Floyd. In Charlotte, 30 people were arrested during the second night of protests, according to WBTV.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

Arrests of anti-abortion protesters in multiple North Carolina cities, including Charlotte, made national headlines, prompting many high-profile politicians to accuse the police of violating the arrested protesters’ constitutional rights.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

U.S. Department of Justice warned that those who intentionally spread coronavirus (COVID-19) would be charged with terrorism. A CNN report cited a DOJ memorandum that warned individuals against purposefully spreading COVID-19. A person could be charged with terrorism for coughing on other people or groceries or for other forms of the “purposeful exposure and infection of others,” the memo, which was sent to federal law enforcement agencies and attorneys.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question:”A past conviction is keeping me from finding work. What can I do?”

We have all done things in our past that we would like to forget. Unfortunately, if what you want to forget was a conviction for a crime, your criminal record will make that difficult. However, some crimes might be able to be wiped from your criminal record. There are different tools that might be used to clean up a person’s criminal record, but one of the most common is expungement.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I am charged by campus police could I still face jail time or probation?”

The “Ban the Box” movement appears to be picking up steam across the country as more and more states pass measures aimed at removing a hurdle that often discourages those with criminal records from even trying to find work. President Obama has now waded into the issue, moving on the federal level to end the practice of pre-screening for previous criminal infractions. Advocates of “Ban the Box” measures are celebrating the victory, though believe much work remains to be done before those with criminal records truly have a fair shot at finding gainful employment.

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