Articles Tagged with law-enforcement

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What am I obligated to do if I’ve been pulled for Drinking and Driving?”

In North Carolina, a driver can be charged with Driving While Impaired (DWI) if he or she has a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or more, or driving with an impairing substance or with any amount of a Schedule I substance in his or her system. DWIs are dangerous for all parties involved. As such, this is a serious charge that can result in severe consequences that impact one’s life. Even so, it is important that a driver arrested and charged with this crime is entitled to proper criminal procedure. Law enforcement officers are human; they too can make mistakes. If law enforcement makes a mistake while arresting a driver, this can be used to reduce charges or even dismiss a case. The following are common mistakes that officers might make during a DWI arrest.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What am I obligated to do if I’ve been pulled for Drinking and Driving?”

In North Carolina, drivers can be charged with driving while impaired (DWI) if they are under the “influence of an impairing substance,” have a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or more, or are driving with any amount of specific controlled substances in their system. For most people, when they are charged with a DWI, they feel discouraged and like there is no way the situation will end with a positive outcome. Yes, a DWI is a serious offense that law enforcement is adamant about prosecuting it. However, this does not mean that anything that law enforcement does while arresting you or while suspecting you might be impaired is acceptable. Like anyone, law enforcement officers can make mistakes. A mistake by law enforcement could help your case. Police must follow a strict protocol. The following are common mistakes to look out for in a DWI arrest.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

When law enforcement suspects that a person is in possession of contraband, a stolen item, or some other type of illegal substance/item, they will often obtain a search warrant to find that item. In North Carolina, a search warrant is defined as, “a court order and process directing a law enforcement officer to search designated premises, vehicles, or persons.” This definition gives potential for a location, vehicle, or even persons being subject to a search. Most commonly, search warrants are for places like homes, vehicles, etc. It is not as common for a search warrant to be executed for the search of an individual person.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Is there more than one way for police to charge a person with DWI?”

Elizabeth Renter was driving for the rideshare service Lyft in Illinois when she got into an accident that killed her passenger. Renter was charged with a misdemeanor count of driving under the influence of a drug. Travis Anderson was the driver of the car that crashed into the Lyft driver, and was also found to be under the influence, according to The Patch.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

We have discussed civil asset forfeiture many times before, usually noting the ways in which the practice is used to unfairly seize assets from often-innocent individuals, enriching law enforcement agencies at the expense of the public. Given how lucrative civil asset forfeiture can be for law enforcement agencies across the country, there is little incentive for states to take action to reform the broken system. Thankfully, legislators in one state appear to be ready for a change and are considering important revisions to the existing law.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What should I do if I have been pulled over and I have been drinking ?”

Everyone who reads or watches the news knows about the devastating impact drug addiction has had on the country. Families in every county of every state have been ripped apart due to the allure of drugs, whether those obtained on the streets or those obtained through a pharmacy. Opioids in particular have blazed a path of destruction across large swaths of the country.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

The mugshot is something that an average person would immediately associate with a brush with the law. The assumption is that anyone and everyone who is arrested or convicted of a crime must have been booked and had his or her mugshot taken. While that is true in many cases, it is not the case all the time. A recent high-profile case dealt with exactly this issue and ended with the defendant being ordered by a judge to report to have his mugshot taken.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “When can I post on Social media about my ongoing case?”

The news that prosecutors have asked Amazon to release data from its Echo personal assistant grabbed headlines across the country this past week. The tech industry has been abuzz with one of the industry leaders embroiled in a dispute with law enforcement. Privacy advocates have been alarmed by the effort to further invade a person’s home, a formerly sacred space. Finally, the law enforcement community is up in arms, arguing that if information exists which could solve a murder it should be brought to light to assist victims rather than protected to help suspects.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

To many people, involuntary commitment in a psychiatric facility seems like the equivalent of jail when it comes to restricting your freedoms; for some, it could be considered even worse. However, the majority of the N.C. Court of Appeals feels differently, with a divided panel recently ruling that a man who was involuntarily committed after he tried to kill himself was not in custody for Miranda warning purposes.

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Charlotte DWI and Criminal Defense Attorney J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “If I simply intend to plead guilty, why do I need a lawyer?”

In a potentially groundbreaking move, a federal judge ordered Apple to assist law enforcement with decrypting of the iPhone that belonged to one of the San Bernardino shooters.