Articles Tagged with DWI

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “How can an attorney help me with my DWI?”

Most people in North Carolina rely on their car to get them from one place to another. While there may be public transportation options, rideshare options, or any other type of transportation, for the most part, people get around by car. Imagine being completely dependent on a car to get you to work, school, or even social events. What happens if you suddenly do not have a license anymore? For those individuals who are arrested and/or convicted for driving while impaired (DWI), that is a sobering reality. Often times, after an individual is arrested and charged for a suspected DWI, he or she faces immediate license revocation, even without the conviction. An arrest and/or charge is enough to revoke a license.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

Being charged with a crime in North Carolina can be scary. Suddenly, you are facing serious penalties and even a prison sentence that could be devastating to your life. In criminal cases, most people think of a defendant being found “guilty” or “not guilty.” Not guilty is the ideal finding in a criminal case, but that is not always the result. When defendants hear a guilty verdict, they might think that their lives are ruined. In criminal cases in North Carolina, there are some options for a defendant, even after a finding of guilt.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Why is it important to hire a DWI lawyer quickly after being charged with a DWI?”

Drinking and driving is a serious offense in North Carolina. As such, a conviction of driving while impaired (DWI) can result in serious consequences. Common punishments include fines, jail time, probation, and license suspension. Most people rely on driving to get around. When there is no convenient access to public transportation, lack of carpooling options, or any other transportation issue, the suspension of a license can be inconvenient and catastrophic. That is why you need an experienced DWI attorney to represent you in any DWI proceeding so that you can get the best outcome possible given the circumstances.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Is there more than one way for police to charge a person with DWI?”

Elizabeth Renter was driving for the rideshare service Lyft in Illinois when she got into an accident that killed her passenger. Renter was charged with a misdemeanor count of driving under the influence of a drug. Travis Anderson was the driver of the car that crashed into the Lyft driver, and was also found to be under the influence, according to The Patch.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question:”What is an expungement?”

The U.S. Supreme Court is poised to have what many legal experts believe will be a blockbuster year, issuing a number of significant decisions. The docket appears packed with controversial and consequential cases. Last year the court was down a member following the death of Justice Scalia and the justices were not eager to accept potentially divisive cases given the odds of a 4-4 split. Now that Justice Gorsuch has been confirmed, the Court has ramped up its workload.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I simply intend to plead guilty, why do I need a lawyer?”

It’s been a few years now since the U.S. Supreme Court issued a landmark DUI decision in Birchfield v. North Dakota. That case represented a major development in drunk driving jurisprudence and the impact continues to be felt across the country. Since the Supreme Court issued its opinion, state courts have struggled to interpret the decision and decide how it impacts cases that were pending prior to its issuance.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Is there more than one way for police to charge a person with DWI?”

Typically, when you imagine a person using drugs or alcohol while driving you would expect that to lead rather quickly to a drunk driving charge. Though this is exactly the sort of situation that DUI/DWI crimes were meant to address, a recent incident in Atlanta highlights an odd facet of the system. According to law enforcement authorities, the fact that one driver was so far gone, clearly impaired and destructive, meant he actually managed to avoid a DUI charge. Now let’s explain why.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

After former FBI director James Comey’s recent testimony before Congress, the media has been awash in conversation about obstruction of justice. The question on many minds is whether Comey’s testimony made a sufficiently compelling case for obstruction of justice charges, something that could land President Trump in serious legal hot water. But what is obstruction of justice and what might happen in this case even if it is found to have occurred? To find out, keep reading.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

As technology improves, it’s all but guaranteed that some enterprising criminal will find new ways to perpetrate crimes. After all, where there’s a will, it won’t be long until there’s a way. Though technological advancement has proven useful for those perpetrating crimes, it’s proven to be even more of a boon for those investigating criminal matters. Police have stayed several steps ahead of the courts, taking advantage of ambiguities in the law to use technology for their benefit.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

When most people think of hate crimes they imagine criminal acts that occur because one person was motivated by a particular animus against the victim. This animus can be based on a number of things, such as the victim’s race, gender or sexual orientation. If such animosity motivates a crime, it stands to reason that the defendant could be charged with committing a hate crime. However, as a case in West Virginia demonstrates, that might not always be true.