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Articles Tagged with BAC

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Are breath test results always accurate?”

A driving while impaired (DWI) conviction carries harsh penalties and lasting consequences. One of the penalties is the suspension of a driver’s license.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Is there more than one way for police to charge a person with DWI?”

Many people mistakenly believe that they can only be charged with driving while impaired (DWI) if they are above the legal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit, which is 0.08% in North Carolina.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Is there more than one way for police to charge a person with DWI?”

Many North Carolinians mistakenly believe that they cannot be charged with driving while impaired, also known as DWI, if they are not actually driving a vehicle. But is that correct?

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Is there more than one way for police to charge a person with DWI?”

https://youtu.be/pVA1KZIyp_M

North Carolina’s Zero Tolerance Law makes it illegal for people under the age of 21 to drive with any amount of alcohol or drugs in their system. People who are caught driving after consuming alcohol are charged with an underage or provisional DWI (driving while impaired).

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What happens if I am convicted of a DUI or DWI in Charlotte North Carolina?”

In North Carolina, drivers who kill other persons in a drunk driving crash or while committing a traffic violation are charged with death by vehicle, also known as vehicular homicide.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What happens if I am convicted of a DUI or DWI in Charlotte North Carolina?”

In North Carolina, as in many other states, being charged with driving while impaired (DWI) is a serious offense that carries harsh penalties, including fines and even a potential jail sentence. Many of those who have been charged with DWI in North Carolina are wondering if it is possible to reduce the charge to a less serious offense, such as reckless driving.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Are breath test results always accurate?”

If you were pulled over for driving while impaired (DWI) in Charlotte or other parts of North Carolina, a police officer might order a breathalyzer test to determine your blood alcohol concentration (BAC).

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What am I obligated to do if I’ve been pulled for Drinking and Driving?”

In the United States, alcohol is the primary cause for most deaths that occur while driving. Alcohol intoxication limits a driver’s ability to perform safely for several reasons. For example, alcohol intoxication blurs one’s vision and harms one’s ability to react. Since a person’s reaction time increases due to alcohol intoxication, intoxicated drivers do not have the proper ability to quickly think when confronted with an emergency. Even if a driver uses his or her car after a single drink and is under the .08% limit of Blood-Alcohol Concentration (BAC), police may still arrest that driver if he or she seems impaired while driving.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

Police are an integral part of society; they keep the peace, catch criminals, and put their lives at risk to keep the general population safe. Since the police play such a large role in solving crimes and convicting criminals, it is not surprising that police officers are often called to testify during court proceedings. An issue arises with police testimony, however, when the officer testifying was not involved with the incident at all. Instead, that officer is offering an opinion, based off of his or her police experience, as to what happened or would have happened. This practice is controversial because someone without actual knowledge, or only investigative knowledge, of the incident is offering testimony that could sway a jury.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Is there more than one way for police to charge a person with DWI?”

We all know the dangers of drinking and driving. Accidents happen everyday because a driver is under the influence of drugs or alcohol and injures or kills someone else. Driving while impaired (DWI) charges are taken very seriously in North Carolina. It can be extremely frustrating to be facing these charges when you know you were not operating your vehicle while impaired. Find more resources about DWI here.

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