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Articles Tagged with Criminal Charges

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “When can I post on Social media about my ongoing case?”

If you are facing criminal charges in North Carolina, your potential sentence for the offense could be reduced if “mitigating circumstances” are found. In North Carolina, felony sentences depend on whether any mitigating or aggravating circumstances exist.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

They say it is better to apologize late than never. However, the same principle does not apply when you are being accused of a crime, especially if you did not commit one.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

After 108 homicides in Charlotte last year, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department prepared a map of violent crime “hot spots” in the city. The map was shown to members of the Charlotte City Council. The department told council members that it would use all available data to address crime as a public health issue. However, CMPD also complained that it would not be able to lower violent crime on its own, as reported by WFAE.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

A new report by the FBI showed a slight decrease in hate crimes in Charlotte metro last year compared with 2017. The Federal Bureau of Investigation tracks the number of hate crimes, along with all other types of non-violent and violent crimes, on a year-over-year basis.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Am I allowed to videotape an interaction with police? Can they make me stop filming?”

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police (CMPD) has announced drastic changes to its electronic monitoring program in the city amid concerns that people released from jail before trial pose a serious public safety risk.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

Stealing a motor vehicle is a serious crime in North Carolina. In addition to auto theft charges, a person can be found guilty of a crime when he or she uses, damages, or misappropriates someone else’s vehicle.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I simply intend to plead guilty, why do I need a lawyer?”

It may seem that filing a false police report does no harm, but doing so can result in criminal charges in North Carolina. Although the reasons why people make untrue claims to police officers vary, it makes sense that the law does not tolerate false police reports. After all, one of the duties of law enforcement is to take seriously every claim filed by citizens.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

A new report shows that a doctor convicted of sex crimes in Missouri did his medical training in Charlotte. The doctor was convicted of sexually abusing patients who came for pain treatment during 2016 and 2017.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

As technology advances, so must the law. The problem is that sometimes the law is slow to catch up to technological advances, and it can take even longer for the law to cover each little nuance that might arise. Digital devices, like cell phones and other electronics, are by no means a new development in technology, but there are advances made every day, and these devices become more and more integral to committing crimes. One problem that often arises is issuing a search warrant for an electronic device and the digital contents contained on the device. Courts are left to make a decision on what the requirements are for issuing a search warrant for a digital device and when they are appropriate.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

As technology advances, so do law enforcement’s methods of obtaining evidence and solving crimes. Law enforcement officers today are able to conduct searches using drones, which can fly over land and collect video footage and photos. The police often use drones to find missing or stolen property. Recently, a lawsuit arose after police officers flew a drone over private property to find stolen construction equipment.