Articles Tagged with criminal trial

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

Manslaughter charges occur when someone dies due to the negligence of someone else. If you are charged with manslaughter you are facing severe consequences if you are found guilty. Manslaughter is different from murder because of the state of mind of the defendant at the time of commission of the crime. Murder shows intent, malice, or aforethought or extreme disregard for human life. When a person is killed without specific intent to murder, the likely charge will be manslaughter. Because manslaughter charges are considered serious, you will want to fight the case with help from an experienced criminal defense attorney in North Carolina.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

When you have been charged with a crime you may feel scared and unsure of what to expect. Your charges could result in severe punishments if you are convicted. You may wonder whether you will be able to take a plea deal or whether they will even offer one. A plea deal, also called a plea bargain, is a common option for those facing a wide range of criminal charges. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, up to 95% of all state and federal criminal cases conclude with a plea bargain rather than a trial.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

Imagine a scenario in which two individuals in North Carolina commit the same exact felony crime. Should their charges and sentencing be equal? While many people may instinctively answer “Yes,” the reality (as any experienced criminal defense attorney may be quick to point out) is much more complicated.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Am I allowed to videotape an interaction with police? Can they make me stop filming?”

If you watch any TV crime drama, you will likely hear the phrase “right to a speedy trial.” This phrase is thrown about in many television scenes, but most people do not know what that means in real life. For most, a speedy trial means that criminal charges and prosecution must be done as quick as possible. Determining what the court finds to be “quick,” however, varies on many different factors.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

Criminal cases are seldom very exciting. Though TV and movies would have you believe differently, the reality is that court rules and procedures restrict what participants are able to do spur of the moment and instead try and make the process more predictable. It is quite rare for a prosecutor or defense attorney, even more so, a judge, to make a decision or take an action seemingly out of the blue.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

After former FBI director James Comey’s recent testimony before Congress, the media has been awash in conversation about obstruction of justice. The question on many minds is whether Comey’s testimony made a sufficiently compelling case for obstruction of justice charges, something that could land President Trump in serious legal hot water. But what is obstruction of justice and what might happen in this case even if it is found to have occurred? To find out, keep reading.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question:”What is an expungement?”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRNgcf2GsDY

When most people think of the criminal justice system, they likely imagine something similar to an episode of Law & Order. Police officers testifying, prosecutors and defense attorneys arguing, judges slamming gavels and jurors listening in rapt attention. According to experts, while this may be the way things happen on television, it is most assuredly not typical in the real world. An overwhelming majority of cases are resolved through plea bargaining, something that few people fully understand despite the important impact it has on our criminal justice system.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

Lots of juicy television police procedurals spend time showing what goes on during jury deliberations. The deliberations often make for good television because of the interest people have in what goes on behind the scenes, a space usually out of view to most people. It’s fun to imagine what real jurors have to say to one another, something that in the real world, criminal defendants don’t have the luxury of knowing. The reason for the interest is that in almost all cases, a jury’s deliberations are meant to be secret.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “The person that called the police doesn’t want to press charges, can I still be prosecuted?”

A 38-year-old former high school teacher being prosecuted for sexual contact with a student is being slammed by the district attorney on his case for having just married the alleged victim.

Brad Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Should I talk to the police?”

Normally when a person stands accused of committing a crime, he or she seeks out a skilled criminal defense attorney to help prepare the strongest defense possible. The goal is to rely on the lawyer’s legal expertise to ensure you achieve the best resolution possible. Curiously, some defendants appear to be more interested in pursuing a bizarre and unsuccessful approach, known as the “Moorish defense”. To find out more, keep reading.

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