Articles Tagged with fines

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

Your vehicle is one of the most important necessities of life. You may need a vehicle to get to school or work, to drive family to appointments, to run errands, and more. Life is certainly more difficult and complicated when you do not have a car. Although you may have worked hard to get your car, it can be taken away by the police in a vehicle seizure. When that happens, you need to act quickly in order to try to get your vehicle back. An experienced North Carolina criminal defense attorney can assist you in the process of how you may be able to get your car returned after a vehicle seizure.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

Rules are in place to ensure that drivers are careful on the road. The law requires drivers to have liability insurance to cover any damages and injuries that occur due to their negligence in an accident. Although most accidents are minor, some are more serious and result in severe injuries. Those who are involved in accidents are required to remain on the scene. If you leave the scene of an accident, you may face criminal charges. If you face criminal charges for fleeing the scene of an accident, you may want to consult with a criminal defense attorney as soon as possible.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Do I have to perform the field sobriety tests when I’m pulled over for DWI in NC?”

When you get pulled over by the police, they may wonder whether you have been drinking. Law enforcement may ask you to perform some field sobriety tests (FSTs). You may be familiar with these types of tests that police officers use to assess your sobriety. These tests are designed to assess your potential level of alcohol impairment. FSTs are commonly used across all law enforcement agencies in the state and country. A DWI charge can be extremely serious and could result in severe consequences such as the loss of your driving privileges, fines, jail time, and other penalties.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

Manslaughter charges occur when someone dies due to the negligence of someone else. If you are charged with manslaughter you are facing severe consequences if you are found guilty. Manslaughter is different from murder because of the state of mind of the defendant at the time of commission of the crime. Murder shows intent, malice, or aforethought or extreme disregard for human life. When a person is killed without specific intent to murder, the likely charge will be manslaughter. Because manslaughter charges are considered serious, you will want to fight the case with help from an experienced criminal defense attorney in North Carolina.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What am I obligated to do if I’ve been pulled for Drinking and Driving?”

Disorderly conduct and public intoxication are actions that when combined may result in criminal charges. Disruptive behaviors along with intoxication may also result in criminal charges. Although you may often hear about public intoxication, it is not a crime to be drunk in public unless there are accompanying behaviors that are disruptive. North Carolina law provides for a number of acts that are disruptive. These include blocking traffic, blocking a sidewalk, starting a fight, cursing at or insulting someone, and begging. If you are charged with a disorderly conduct type of charge, it can come with significant penalties and a conviction will give you a criminal record. It is best to seek legal assistance from a reputable criminal defense attorney as soon as possible.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

A charge of disorderly conduct is typically a misdemeanor crime that may encompass a variety of actions. The police often may charge disorderly conduct along with other charges in a case. While disorderly conduct may seem like a minor crime, it can still cause you problems and can stay on your record. When you are charged with disorderly conduct you may get released immediately or may be held until your first hearing. You will want to fight disorderly conduct charges with the help of an experienced criminal defense attorney,

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

When you are charged with a crime, it is important to understand the severity of the charges and potential penalties. There are two main classifications of crimes including misdemeanors and felonies. Felony crimes are generally more serious and therefore they include more substantial consequences if convicted. Misdemeanors are usually less serious in nature and if convicted you will be subject to less harsh penalties than felonies. It is helpful to explore misdemeanor crimes to learn more about them and their sentences.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Is there more than one way for police to charge a person with DWI?”

Ask any American who was alive a generation ago or longer, and they will confirm what is apparent: The United States’ stances on marijuana possession and use are changing drastically.  While a criminal defense attorney may have once worked with a client on a serious marijuana possession charge at the felony level, this same charge today may be significantly less severe due to the nation’s changing attitudes on the drug.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

In North Carolina, drivers who leave the scene of a car accident can face criminal charges for a hit-and-run. The consequences of a hit-and-run conviction in North Carolina depend on whether the crime is classified as a felony or a misdemeanor.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Is there more than one way for police to charge a person with DWI?”

Some people assume that you can be charged with driving while intoxicated (DWI) only when you are impaired by alcohol. In reality, however, you can be arrested for operating a vehicle while impaired by marijuana or any other impairing substance (N.C.G.S. § 20-138.1).

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