Our office continues to operate during our regular business hours, which are 8:30 am - 5:30 pm, Monday through Friday, but you can call the office 24 hours a day. We continue to follow all recommendations and requirements of the State of Emergency Stay at Home Order. Consultations are available via telephone or by video conference. The safety of our clients and employees is of the utmost importance and, therefore, in-person meetings are not available at this time except for emergencies or absolutely essential legal services.

Articles Posted in Charlotte Crime

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

The most recent research published on 24/7 Wall St. revealed the most common types of crimes that are being committed in Charlotte and other parts of North Carolina. The study concluded that in 2018, the most recent year for which crime data is available, crime was more common in North Carolina than it was on average across the United States.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

The killing of George Floyd by a police officer in Minneapolis, Minnesota, triggered a wave of nationwide protests against racial injustice and police brutality.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

Shootings and unlawful possession of firearms have spiked in Charlotte despite the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home orders. Police department officials in Charlotte are urging the public to stay safe because it appears that the pandemic did not affect violent crime in the city.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Do I need to hire an attorney if I have been falsely accused?”

With more people wearing face masks amid the COVID-19 pandemic, criminals may be more emboldened by the possibility of staying unidentified when committing a crime. But does it mean that surgical face masks, which are meant to curb the spread of coronavirus, contribute to more crime in Charlotte and other parts of North Carolina?

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

After North Carolina’s “stay-at-home” order went into effect on March 30, 2020, to slow the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), many residents began to wonder, “Can I be fined or arrested for violating the order?” and “Are there criminal charges if I do not comply with the order?

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

As North Carolina residents were ordered to stay home from March 30 due to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), some of you might wonder, “Does it mean that people will commit more crimes?” or, on the contrary, can it lead to a reduction in violent crimes and other crimes?

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

A new report by Charlotte Observer explores the most murderous stretch of road in the city. The street, which is about 3,350 feet long, is one of Charlotte’s “hot spots” that account for about 8% of the city’s violent crime.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

After 108 homicides in Charlotte last year, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department prepared a map of violent crime “hot spots” in the city. The map was shown to members of the Charlotte City Council. The department told council members that it would use all available data to address crime as a public health issue. However, CMPD also complained that it would not be able to lower violent crime on its own, as reported by WFAE.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

A new report by the FBI showed a slight decrease in hate crimes in Charlotte metro last year compared with 2017. The Federal Bureau of Investigation tracks the number of hate crimes, along with all other types of non-violent and violent crimes, on a year-over-year basis.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Am I allowed to videotape an interaction with police? Can they make me stop filming?”

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police (CMPD) has announced drastic changes to its electronic monitoring program in the city amid concerns that people released from jail before trial pose a serious public safety risk.

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