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Articles Tagged with marijuana

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

A North Carolina task force calls for the decriminalization of marijuana in the state. The state’s Task Force for Racial Equity in Criminal Justice has adopted recommendations to decriminalize possession of marijuana in North Carolina.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

A 30-year-old man from Charlotte is facing multiple drug possession charges following an undercover police sting operation. The report brings North Carolina’s drug possession laws back into the spotlight.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “How is getting charged with a crime on a college campus different from being charged off campus?”

As society evolves and changes, the laws that govern us also need to evolve. A hot button topic in politics right now is updating existing drug laws and their sentences. A North Carolina state senator has introduced a bill to the North Carolina Senate that would decriminalize the possession of marijuana for up to three ounces. A similar version to this bill was introduced about a year ago, but that proposed possession limit was increased to four ounces.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Is there more than one way for police to charge a person with DWI?”

We  have all heard of a driving under influence (DUI) or driving while impaired (DWI). Additionally, most associate both a DUI and a DWI with drinking too much alcohol and getting behind the wheel of a vehicle. In North Carolina, DUIs and DWIs are often thought of as the same thing and used interchangeably. Did you know that is it not just alcohol that can result in a DUI or DWI charge? Driving under the influence of drugs can also result in a DWI or DUI charge.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

The state of North Carolina is strict on drug crimes. In an effort to eliminate the use of drugs throughout the state, courts and lawmakers have been eager to crack down on the use, sale, and possession of controlled substances. Recently, the North Carolina Supreme Court has broadened the meaning of “maintaining a dwelling” as it pertains to using, selling, or storing a controlled substance. In State v. Rogers, the court disavows previous courts’ use of  “maintaining a dwelling” and broadens the use of the term.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Do I have to perform the field sobriety tests when I’m pulled over for DWI in NC?”

One of the things that critics of marijuana legalization have long argued is that by opening the door to marijuana you would encourage other criminal infractions, with pot serving as a kind of gateway to all sorts of bad behaviors. This could include increased use of stronger drugs, commission of petty crimes and increases in rates of impaired driving. A recent study commissions by the Philadelphia Federal Reserve comes to the opposite conclusion, finding that marijuana legalization in Colorado ushered in even lower crime rates. To learn more, keep reading.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

It has long been the case that police can claim they smell marijuana in order to gain the probable cause needed to search your person, vehicle or other personal property you have with you in states where the substance is still illegal.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

Tribal territory in Cherokee, North Carolina is closer than any other area in North Carolina to legalizing marijuana for its citizens. A group called Common Sense Cannabis (CSC) is conducting a survey, to be presented to the tribal leadership, asking the reservation’s residents what they think of medical marijuana.

Charlotte DWI and Criminal Defense Attorney J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Are breath test results always accurate?”

Since the gradual decriminalization and legalization of marijuana state-by-state in recent years, many say it was only a matter of time.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?

Marijuana legalization is a concept that went from seemingly impossible to near mainstream in the span of only a few years. Washington and Colorado were among the early movers that have paved the way for other states who are now taking the plunge. Oregon, though not the first to abolish legal consequences for growing, possessing and buying marijuana, has taken a step ahead of other states by tackling the issue of criminal records of those with marijuana-related crimes.

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