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Articles Tagged with Drug Crimes

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

Shootings and unlawful possession of firearms have spiked in Charlotte despite the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home orders. Police department officials in Charlotte are urging the public to stay safe because it appears that the pandemic did not affect violent crime in the city.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

In North Carolina, felony drug charges are one of the most serious crimes an individual can face. A conviction could lead to hefty fines and decades in prison, not to mention that a drug conviction on your criminal record will impact your ability to find a job, go to college, and even find a place to live, among other consequences.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

It may seem that facial recognition is everywhere in the 21st century. The technology that can identify a person by comparing an image of his or her face to a database of photos and videos is used by airports, police departments, and even your phone.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

A new report by Charlotte Observer explores the most murderous stretch of road in the city. The street, which is about 3,350 feet long, is one of Charlotte’s “hot spots” that account for about 8% of the city’s violent crime.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

After 108 homicides in Charlotte last year, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department prepared a map of violent crime “hot spots” in the city. The map was shown to members of the Charlotte City Council. The department told council members that it would use all available data to address crime as a public health issue. However, CMPD also complained that it would not be able to lower violent crime on its own, as reported by WFAE.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

An arrest for robbery entails serious felony charges in North Carolina. Those arrested for robbery risk losing their freedom and getting a criminal record with permanent negative consequences for their career, reputation, and quality of life.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “As a parent, what should I be aware of when speaking to police about charges my child faces?”

Landmark Criminal Justice Reform Coming to North Carolina on Dec. 1, 2019

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

A 30-year-old man from Charlotte is facing multiple drug possession charges following an undercover police sting operation. The report brings North Carolina’s drug possession laws back into the spotlight.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

The state of North Carolina is strict on drug crimes. In an effort to eliminate the use of drugs throughout the state, courts and lawmakers have been eager to crack down on the use, sale, and possession of controlled substances. Recently, the North Carolina Supreme Court has broadened the meaning of “maintaining a dwelling” as it pertains to using, selling, or storing a controlled substance. In State v. Rogers, the court disavows previous courts’ use of  “maintaining a dwelling” and broadens the use of the term.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

We have discussed civil asset forfeiture before and how there is growing consensus around the country that the practice has many negatives and unfairly impacts those who are already among the most vulnerable. The system enriches local law enforcement departments, allowing them to seize the personal property of individuals who may never be charged with a criminal offense. Critics have long complained about the practice and those complaints seem to finally be catching the attention of lawmakers empowered to pass meaningful reforms.

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