Articles Tagged with South End

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

In North Carolina, as in other states, there are two main categories of crimes that include misdemeanors and felonies. Although you might be charged with a misdemeanor, it does not mean you should not take the charges seriously. Even misdemeanor convictions result in severe punishments and could negatively impact your life for many years. If you are charged with a crime, regardless of the classification, it is usually in your best interest to seek guidance from a qualified criminal defense attorney in North Carolina. Your attorney will protect your rights and strongly defend the charges.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

Manslaughter charges occur when someone dies due to the negligence of someone else. If you are charged with manslaughter you are facing severe consequences if you are found guilty. Manslaughter is different from murder because of the state of mind of the defendant at the time of commission of the crime. Murder shows intent, malice, or aforethought or extreme disregard for human life. When a person is killed without specific intent to murder, the likely charge will be manslaughter. Because manslaughter charges are considered serious, you will want to fight the case with help from an experienced criminal defense attorney in North Carolina.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

After North Carolina’s “stay-at-home” order went into effect on March 30, 2020, to slow the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), many residents began to wonder, “Can I be fined or arrested for violating the order?” and “Are there criminal charges if I do not comply with the order?

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

A new report by Charlotte Observer explores the most murderous stretch of road in the city. The street, which is about 3,350 feet long, is one of Charlotte’s “hot spots” that account for about 8% of the city’s violent crime.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

It is scary to think about turning yourself in to the North Carolina police, let alone actually to go to the police station and do it. Many of those who consider turning themselves in are aware of a warrant for their arrest.

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