Articles Tagged with Miranda rights

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What am I obligated to do if I’ve been pulled for Drinking and Driving?”

In North Carolina, drivers can be charged with driving while impaired (DWI) if they are under the “influence of an impairing substance,” have a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or more, or are driving with any amount of specific controlled substances in their system. For most people, when they are charged with a DWI, they feel discouraged and like there is no way the situation will end with a positive outcome. Yes, a DWI is a serious offense that law enforcement is adamant about prosecuting it. However, this does not mean that anything that law enforcement does while arresting you or while suspecting you might be impaired is acceptable. Like anyone, law enforcement officers can make mistakes. A mistake by law enforcement could help your case. Police must follow a strict protocol. The following are common mistakes to look out for in a DWI arrest.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

To many people, involuntary commitment in a psychiatric facility seems like the equivalent of jail when it comes to restricting your freedoms; for some, it could be considered even worse. However, the majority of the N.C. Court of Appeals feels differently, with a divided panel recently ruling that a man who was involuntarily committed after he tried to kill himself was not in custody for Miranda warning purposes.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

The man suspected of planting the bombs on the Jersey Shore and in Manhattan last month is being represented by attorneys for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) after being denied access to a federal public defender.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

“You have the right to remain silent…”, a phrase that almost all of us know, but few truly understand. The words are part of what has become known as a Miranda Warning or Miranda Rights. The Miranda Warning started 50 years ago in June and, in that time, has become deeply imbedded not only in criminal law, but in popular culture. Given the upcoming anniversary, now is a good time to spend a moment diving a bit deeper and learn what the Miranda Rights are and how they came to be.

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J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

An exciting new ruling came out of the federal Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals this February. This is the federal court that has jurisdiction over North Carolina, and it held that a state court was objectively unreasonable in not finding that a defendant’s trial attorney provided Ineffective Assistance of Counsel when the attorney failed to move to suppress the defendant’s confession.