Articles Tagged with Charlotte Criminal Lawyer

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

A big case that gripped the nation several years ago has finally come to a close. The case, against the owner and head pharmacist at the New England Compounding Center, garnered tremendous public attention after a fungal meningitis outbreak back in 2012 resulted in injuries to hundreds and death to 64 people. It turned out that tainted injections from the NECC, a compounding pharmacy located outside of Boston, were responsible. In a surprise to many, prosecutors went after the owner not only for things like racketeering and mail fraud, but also charged him with 25 counts of second-degree murder.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

In a deeply troubling case, federal prosecutors were forced to drop child pornography charges against one man after the FBI investigators refused to reveal the source of the information being used to implicate him. The case is unusual in many ways, one of which is that the FBI was allowed to commit a terrible crime in an attempt to capture other criminals. It now seems like the sacrifice was for nothing, as the man (and many others) may have their charges dropped.

In the days since Michael Flynn resigned as President Trump’s national security adviser, there have been a lot of questions and not many answers. Many still wonder exactly what transpired between Flynn and the Russian ambassador he now admits to having had contact with. Though we still don’t know the details of many of those conversations, we can discuss potential criminal aspects of Flynn’s resignation, of which there are several.

American-Flag-Charlotte-Criminal-Lawyer-300x217First, let’s talk about Flynn. Did he break any laws that could result in criminal action? There are two issues at play here: 1) the Logan Act and 2) potential false statements. First, the Logan Act is a piece of legislation that makes it a crime for a private citizen to communicate with a foreign government without proper authority in an attempt to influence the actions of the foreign government. The law is an oldie, but a goodie, having been signed back in 1799 by then President John Adams. The law resulted from actions by a state legislator who went behind the president’s back to try and negotiate a settlement to an undeclared war with France.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

Anyone who has been watching the news recently has likely come across a number of stories about problems associated with the police. The Black Lives Matter movement grew after a number of African-Americans were injured or killed by police officers engaged in questionable behavior. Even putting aside these most tragic cases, many agree that aggressive policing tactics have caused problems that our society must now address as many people feel victimized by those who are meant to protect and serve.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

States across the country are wrestling with finding ways to deal with increasingly large prison populations. People on both side of the issue acknowledge that as the population of people incarcerated continues to swell it presents a multitude of challenges, some budgetary, some logistical, others societal. One approach advocated by many is to try and reverse the trend by reducing criminal penalties for a range of mainly low-level offenses. By reducing the number of crimes that result in time behind bars, you not only save money, but also hopefully address underlying issues through treatment and reduce recidivism.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Do I need to hire an attorney if I have been falsely accused?”

The news became a national sensation almost immediately after it happened. A group of four black young people in Chicago attacked a mentally-challenged white teenager, tied him up with tape and proceeded to torture him while hurling racial epithets. The group also yelled derogatory things about President Elect Trump. Making matters even more heinous, the group broadcast the video, streaming it live on their Facebook feed.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

In the divided political world of 2016, it’s something that conspiracy theorists love to discuss. What impact could a group of “faithless electors” have on the election results? Though individuals chosen to vote in the Electoral College have previously switched sides, at no time was it more controversial than it is today. Already, at least 9 people have come forward to identify themselves as being interested in voting contrary to the way in which their state’s popular vote outcome. These people have said they intend to vote for a consensus Republican candidate instead of Donald Trump, saying they cannot in good conscience vote for the man. Though political nerds love to discuss the potential mayhem this could cause in Washington, legal experts focus instead on the potential criminal implications should such faithless electors emerge.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

If you’ve ever tried to buy tickets to a concert or other popular live event you understand the frustration felt by many. It can be downright impossible to get tickets to especially hot performances and the reason seldom has to do with other fans. Instead, automated ticketing purchasing software, known as “bots”, frequently scoop up huge numbers of tickets before few if any real people get the chance to buy. This leads to dramatically inflated prices with the bots reselling these tickets on the secondary market. It’s a deal that’s bad for fans and also bad for venues and the artists who aren’t getting the benefit of the higher prices being charged on the secondary market. Everyone, except the bots, lose.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “The person that called the police doesn’t want to press charges, can I still be prosecuted?”

In a lawsuit for malicious prosecution, a York County jury has awarded a $150,000 verdict to a Rock Hill-area man for the county Sheriff’s Office 2012 arrest of the man in a Stand-Your-Ground case in which he argued he should never have been charged.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

When Judge Arnold O. Jones II asked a Wayne County Sheriff’s Deputy to dig around in Jones’ wife’s text message records between her and another man, the deputy didn’t tell him no. The deputy didn’t tell him he would need a warrant for accessing such information. And the deputy definitely didn’t tell Jones that he also worked as a member of an FBI gang task force.