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Articles Tagged with Charlotte Criminal Defense

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

A big case that gripped the nation several years ago has finally come to a close. The case, against the owner and head pharmacist at the New England Compounding Center, garnered tremendous public attention after a fungal meningitis outbreak back in 2012 resulted in injuries to hundreds and death to 64 people. It turned out that tainted injections from the NECC, a compounding pharmacy located outside of Boston, were responsible. In a surprise to many, prosecutors went after the owner not only for things like racketeering and mail fraud, but also charged him with 25 counts of second-degree murder.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

In a deeply troubling case, federal prosecutors were forced to drop child pornography charges against one man after the FBI investigators refused to reveal the source of the information being used to implicate him. The case is unusual in many ways, one of which is that the FBI was allowed to commit a terrible crime in an attempt to capture other criminals. It now seems like the sacrifice was for nothing, as the man (and many others) may have their charges dropped.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I represent myself on a traffic ticket?”

It’s something that’s become increasingly common in recent years, signs warning that drivers are under remote surveillance and can be fined for a variety of bad behaviors, including speeding or running red lights. If and when such a fine occurs, most people open their mail and send in a check, quickly dispensing with the issue and avoiding needless hassle. Thankfully, one law professor in Maryland decided to take a different approach and fought his traffic violation. His story, published on Quartz, is an interesting one and raises some serious concerns about the legal validity of the traffic camera system that so many jurisdictions have so warmly embraced.

Charlotte DWI and Criminal Defense Attorney J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “If I simply intend to plead guilty, why do I need a lawyer?”

In a potentially groundbreaking move, a federal judge ordered Apple to assist law enforcement with decrypting of the iPhone that belonged to one of the San Bernardino shooters.

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