Articles Tagged with concealed carry

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

For millions of Americans, the right to own and operate a firearm, as established under the Second Amendment of the United States Constitution, is not something to be taken lightly. That is why, as any experienced criminal defense attorney could point out, there are over 18 million concealed weapon permits issued in the United States.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

The Second Amendment of the United States Constitution states that citizens have the right to bear arms. While the right to purchase and own guns is a federal right and one of the tenets of our government and society, any experienced criminal defense attorney will point out that it is important to understand your individual state laws regarding gun control.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

While your right to carry firearms is protected under the federal constitution, depending on the circumstances you can still be arrested for carrying a gun in North Carolina. In fact, you can be arrested for having a gun without a permit during a traffic stop in North Carolina. This recently happened to a North Carolina woman traveling through New York. According to the Buffalo News, a woman was arrested for having a gun without a permit. Police officers arrested the woman during a traffic stop in Lackawanna. The 21-year-old was a passenger in a vehicle that was stopped by police for a traffic violation. She was charged with fourth-degree criminal possession of a weapon.

Charlotte DWI and Criminal Defense Attorney J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

The federal appellate court with jurisdiction over North Carolina just ruled in a surprising decision that “armed” does not automatically mean “dangerous” within the context of stop-and-frisk searches by police.

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