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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

We previously covered the recent United States Supreme Court ruling in Birchfield v. North Dakota that addressed the legality of blood tests performed on individuals pulled over under suspicion of driving while impaired. While that decision wasn’t exactly a home run in terms of defendant rights, it was far and away a more solid win than the Court’s decision three (3) days prior in Utah v. Strieff.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “How is getting charged with a crime on a college campus different from being charged off campus?”

Anyone with access to the internet has likely heard about the mess Ryan Lochte and his fellow American Olympic swimmers recently got themselves into in Brazil. The group of four Olympians initially claimed that they were the victims of a robbery, appearing to be yet another example of how Rio is a dangerous place. Days later, a different story began to emerge, one which seems to indicate the group was behaving more like spoiled frat boys than heroic Olympians.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Do I need to hire an attorney if I have been falsely accused?”

A man from North Carolina had a firsthand experience with neighboring South Carolina’s sweeping civil forfeiture law and is now suing to try and recover the property that he says was unjustifiably taken from him. The case illustrates a broader concern about the way law enforcement authorities in South Carolina and elsewhere use generous civil forfeiture laws to pad their bank accounts. Critics say the forfeitures are more about profit than protecting local communities and are calling for action to draw limits on when and how the laws can be used.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “I was found not guilty of a charge, buy my record still shows the charge. What is going on?”

Most people would instinctively assume that secretly recording a woman wearing a skirt from below would qualify as some kind of crime. The act is undoubtedly inappropriate, disturbing and invasive. Though these things would appear to indicate criminal activity, a recent appeals court in Georgia confirmed that, at least in that state, taking such “upskirt” videos is not illegal.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

After a plot straight from the popular sitcom Seinfeld went awry, a Michigan man is facing five (5) years in prison for a felony count of beverage return of non-refundable bottles.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “The person that called the police doesn’t want to press charges, can I still be prosecuted?”

NASA just reported that May 2016 was the hottest month our planet has ever had—and North Carolina’s sweltering temperatures have been no exception. Given that summer is now here it seems as good a time as any to remind people of the dangers of leaving small children and pets in hot vehicles.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

It’s something you may never have thought about: what impact does slow motion video have on your perception of an event? Your first reaction may be, nothing. After all, slow motion is just a helpful way of understanding what happened without losing details in a blur of activity. Though that sounds like a reasonable response, researchers indicate it isn’t true. A recent study showed that watching footage in slow motion can skew the viewer’s perception of the event, allowing them to infer intention where they might not have otherwise.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Am I allowed to videotape an interaction with police? Can they make me stop filming?”

North Carolina now joins the ranks of other states attempting to block the release of potentially inflammatory body camera footage. Earlier this month the governor, Pat McCrory, signed a bill into law that prevents law enforcement recordings, either from body cameras or dashboard cameras, from being released, except with very narrow exceptions. Though some officers have cheered the news, many other groups, including the ACLU and the state’s attorney general have offered criticism, saying the new law makes it harder to hold law enforcement accountable in the event of the use of excessive force.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

For pop culture junkies the Taylor Swift/Kanye West feud dates back a long way, to 2009, to be precise. It was then that Kanye stormed the MTV VMA stage, interrupting Swift’s acceptance speech. The episode garnered tremendous media attention, an outpouring of support for Taylor and scorn for Kanye. The two stars have had several run-ins since, with Swift penning a few thinly-veiled songs about Kanye and Kanye continuing to court controversy.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “How is getting charged with a crime on a college campus different from being charged off campus?”

Almost everyone these days shares passwords for one streaming service or another. It could be HBO, Netflix, Hulu, possibly Spotify. A friend or family member likely paid and let you use their password to gain access. Despite the ubiquity of this behavior, a recent federal court decision might give users sharing passwords cause for concern.