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Board Certified Specialist - North Carolina State Bar
The Charlotte Observer - Best Charlotte Lawyer
The National Trial Lawyers - Top 40 Under 40
Million Dollar Advocates Forum
Super Lawyers
Avvo Rating 10.0 Superb

Our office continues to operate during our regular business hours, which are 8:30 am - 5:30 pm, Monday through Friday, but you can call the office 24 hours a day. We continue to follow all recommendations and requirements of the State of Emergency Stay at Home Order. Consultations are available via telephone or by video conference. The safety of our clients and employees is of the utmost importance and, therefore, in-person meetings are not available at this time except for emergencies or absolutely essential legal services.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

U.S. Department of Justice warned that those who intentionally spread coronavirus (COVID-19) would be charged with terrorism. A CNN report cited a DOJ memorandum that warned individuals against purposefully spreading COVID-19. A person could be charged with terrorism for coughing on other people or groceries or for other forms of the “purposeful exposure and infection of others,” the memo, which was sent to federal law enforcement agencies and attorneys.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

After North Carolina’s “stay-at-home” order went into effect on March 30, 2020, to slow the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), many residents began to wonder, “Can I be fined or arrested for violating the order?” and “Are there criminal charges if I do not comply with the order?

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

As North Carolina residents were ordered to stay home from March 30 due to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), some of you might wonder, “Does it mean that people will commit more crimes?” or, on the contrary, can it lead to a reduction in violent crimes and other crimes?

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

In North Carolina, felony drug charges are one of the most serious crimes an individual can face. A conviction could lead to hefty fines and decades in prison, not to mention that a drug conviction on your criminal record will impact your ability to find a job, go to college, and even find a place to live, among other consequences.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “When can I post on Social media about my ongoing case?”

If you are facing criminal charges in North Carolina, your potential sentence for the offense could be reduced if “mitigating circumstances” are found. In North Carolina, felony sentences depend on whether any mitigating or aggravating circumstances exist.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

It may seem that facial recognition is everywhere in the 21st century. The technology that can identify a person by comparing an image of his or her face to a database of photos and videos is used by airports, police departments, and even your phone.

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Are breath test results always accurate?”

If you were pulled over for driving while impaired (DWI) in Charlotte or other parts of North Carolina, a police officer might order a breathalyzer test to determine your blood alcohol concentration (BAC).

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

A Charlotte woman pleaded guilty in federal court for filing false tax returns. Andrivia Wells, a Charlotte-based tax preparer, entered a guilty plea for three out of 35 counts.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

A new report by Charlotte Observer explores the most murderous stretch of road in the city. The street, which is about 3,350 feet long, is one of Charlotte’s “hot spots” that account for about 8% of the city’s violent crime.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

It is scary to think about turning yourself in to the North Carolina police, let alone actually to go to the police station and do it. Many of those who consider turning themselves in are aware of a warrant for their arrest.

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