Our office continues to operate during our regular business hours, which are 8:30 am - 5:30 pm, Monday through Friday, but you can call the office 24 hours a day. We continue to follow all recommendations and requirements of the State of Emergency Stay at Home Order. Consultations are available via telephone or by video conference. The safety of our clients and employees is of the utmost importance and, therefore, in-person meetings are not available at this time except for emergencies or absolutely essential legal services.

Articles Tagged with Crime rate

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

The most recent research published on 24/7 Wall St. revealed the most common types of crimes that are being committed in Charlotte and other parts of North Carolina. The study concluded that in 2018, the most recent year for which crime data is available, crime was more common in North Carolina than it was on average across the United States.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

Shootings and unlawful possession of firearms have spiked in Charlotte despite the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home orders. Police department officials in Charlotte are urging the public to stay safe because it appears that the pandemic did not affect violent crime in the city.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

As North Carolina residents were ordered to stay home from March 30 due to the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), some of you might wonder, “Does it mean that people will commit more crimes?” or, on the contrary, can it lead to a reduction in violent crimes and other crimes?

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “When can I post on Social media about my ongoing case?”

A hot topic the past week or so has concerned a bill signed into law more than two decades ago. The 1994 Crime Bill has become important of late given the increasingly combative Democratic presidential primary, with Senator Bernie Sanders and his supporters citing the 1994 bill as an example of wrongheaded legislation embraced by Secretary Hillary Clinton, then First Lady. Senator Clinton has since had to distance herself from the 1994 bill and has begun to criticize certain aspects of the legislation, a dramatic turn of events given her and former President Bill Clinton’s once warm embrace of the anti-crime legislation.

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