Articles Tagged with criminal conviction

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question:”What is an expungement?”

We have previously discussed the important changes that will soon go into effect regarding expungements in North Carolina. The law is set to change and will make it easier for more people to wipe the slate clean, deleting from their criminal history certain one-time mistakes that have continued to haunt them years into the future. But what if you do not qualify for expungement? Even though the laws have been loosened to allow more people to experience the benefit of expungement, there are still numerous restrictions that exclude many people in North Carolina.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question:”What is an expungement?”

Most people do not spend time worrying about things like the discovery process. It is legalistic and confusing to those not familiar with the criminal justice system. Though it can be complicated, it is incredibly important and worth understanding. Discovery is meant to shed light on evidence, creating transparency in a justice system that can, at times, be troublingly opaque. As a recent article in the New York Times demonstrates, the discovery process can sometimes go wrong and, when it does, it can have serious consequences.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

It can sometimes seem like we have seen it all before. This is especially true in the criminal law world, where crimes are seldom novel, but often sad cycles continually repeating themselves. Though this is true in some cases, a recent prosecution in Massachusetts demonstrates that individuals can still find new ways to run afoul of the law and, when that happens, it can raise important questions about how these groundbreaking cases ought to be handled.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question: I was found not guilty of a charge, but my record still shows the charge.

As we’ve mentioned many times before, being convicted of a crime can have very serious repercussions on your life. Beyond the obvious fines and jail time, a criminal conviction can cast a long shadow. Those convicted of certain crimes may be denied student loans, certain government housing, face a more difficult time finding work and, in some cases, even be denied food stamps. To find out more about how a criminal conviction could result in a denial of such an important benefit like money for food, keep reading.