Articles Tagged with Drunk Driving

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “How can an attorney help me with my DWI?”

After being charged with a crime, your mind might be reeling. Suddenly, you are thrust into the criminal justice system and are trying to figure out what to do next. Driving while impaired (DWI) is a common charge in North Carolina, otherwise known as drunk driving. An experienced DWI attorney can help qualm your fears and prepare the best possible defense for you. One defense to a DWI that is not always the first to come to mind is necessity. In some instances, it could be a valid defense to a DWI. This is not to say that using necessity as a defense will be an automatic “win,” but instead one of the many defenses that might be used to defend the individual facing a DWI charge.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

A woman named Julie Cantu recently experienced one of the (many) negative aspects of today’s information age. While out on a first date, the man asked her several normal get-to-know-you questions, but then included an odd one about whether she had experienced any brushes with the law. Julie was perplexed about the question and when she got home Googled herself. She was horrified to discover that there, after her LinkedIn photo, was another, much less flattering one: her mugshot from years before when she was arrested for drunk driving.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I simply intend to plead guilty, why do I need a lawyer?”

It’s been a few years now since the U.S. Supreme Court issued a landmark DUI decision in Birchfield v. North Dakota. That case represented a major development in drunk driving jurisprudence and the impact continues to be felt across the country. Since the Supreme Court issued its opinion, state courts have struggled to interpret the decision and decide how it impacts cases that were pending prior to its issuance.

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DWI in North Carolina Most Frequently Asked Questions FAQ

If you’re a regular drinker you might be familiar with your state’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limits. This number is quite important after all, as even a few percentage points can make the difference between being deemed a criminal or a responsible social drinker. The BAC limit measures how much alcohol a person has in his or her system at a given time and this number is used as a proxy for the person’s overall level of intoxication. The idea is that the higher the BAC, the more likely it is that the he or she is dangerously impaired and presents a risk to themselves or others on the road.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers callers’ questions during a 30 minute radio interview with the Legal Forum. Recorded in Charlotte, Mecklenburg County North Carolina.

The Supreme Court voted 7-1 to place limits on laws that make it a crime for drivers suspected of drunk driving to refuse to submit to an alcohol test. The decision says that police must obtain search warrants before requiring a driver to submit to a blood alcohol test. A warrant will not be required, however, for breath tests.

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Charlotte DWI and Criminal Defense Attorney J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Are breath test results always accurate?”

Seven really was a Charlotte man’s lucky number this [week]—or rather, 0.07 was.

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J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What happens if I am convicted of a DUI or DWI in Charlotte North Carolina?”

The Kansas Supreme Court issued a decisive and important ruling late last month concerning the state’s implied consent law. Implied consent laws, for those that may be unclear, say that individuals who operate motor vehicles in the state have given their implied consent to submit to a chemical test to determine intoxication in the event they are pulled over by police. States with implied consent laws also criminalize refusal to submit to such chemical tests, meaning the refusal itself serves as the basis for a criminal prosecution.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers callers’ questions during a 30 minute radio interview with the Legal Forum. Recorded in Charlotte, Mecklenburg County North Carolina.

Most people have heard of ignition interlock devices before. People are vaguely familiar with the idea that a device is attached to your car that you must first blow into before the ignition will turn over. Beyond this bit of information, most people are in the dark about the specifics for how and when ignition interlock devices are used. To find out more about ignition interlock devices and how they work in North Carolina, keep reading.

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Charlotte DWI and Criminal Defense Attorney J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “What am I obligated to do if I’ve been pulled for Drinking and Driving?”

Long before Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson shot Michael Brown, and long before New York City police restrained an alleged untaxed-cigarette seller named Eric Garner, killing him and sparking a wave of protests nationwide, a Texas campus police officer shot and killed a 23-year-old college student outside his campus apartment after pulling him over for suspected drunken driving in circumstances that had some calling for a murder charge against the officer.

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J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

 

The “Hands up, don’t shoot!” moniker is all the rage in the United States, with prominent professional athletes in the National Basketball Association and National Football League, as well as well-known celebrities, politicians, political pundits and media figures adopting the meme—some displaying the same on tee shirts proclaiming the phrase.

Police stop Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Mecklenburg DWI AttorneyLong before the rage—before Michael Brown was shot to death by Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri, and before New Yorker Eric Garner died after being wrestled to the ground by a small team of New York City police officers—an unarmed backseat passenger in Billings, Montana was shot to death for failing to raise his hands during what began as a simple traffic stop.

Officer Grant Morrison said that on the night of April 14, 2014 he saw a car “turn quickly and decided to follow it.” After following it, Morrison said, he pulled the car over because of a “light violation.” Richard Ramirez was a passenger in the car.

Morrison testified at a hearing that after pulling the car over, he noticed that the back right passenger was pushing against the door. Morrison ordered all of the car’s occupants to raise their hands, but the 38-year-old Ramirez kept fumbling for something in his pocket.

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