Articles Tagged with criminal prosecution

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “How is getting charged with a crime on a college campus different from being charged off campus?”

The incident over the weekend in Charlottesville, VA where neo-Nazis and white supremacists gathered to protest the removal of Confederate statues resulted in the tragic death of a young woman. According to authorities, the woman was a counter protestor and was standing on a street corner with others shouting down the assembled white supremacists. James Alex Fields, Jr. is said to have driven his vehicle onto the sidewalk, striking several counter protestors and killing one.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

In the divided political world of 2016, it’s something that conspiracy theorists love to discuss. What impact could a group of “faithless electors” have on the election results? Though individuals chosen to vote in the Electoral College have previously switched sides, at no time was it more controversial than it is today. Already, at least 9 people have come forward to identify themselves as being interested in voting contrary to the way in which their state’s popular vote outcome. These people have said they intend to vote for a consensus Republican candidate instead of Donald Trump, saying they cannot in good conscience vote for the man. Though political nerds love to discuss the potential mayhem this could cause in Washington, legal experts focus instead on the potential criminal implications should such faithless electors emerge.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What should parents tell their children to do when interacting with police officers?”

The Supreme Court this week issued a ruling that many experts believe cleared the way for criminal action against the international soccer organization FIFA. In its ruling, the Supreme Court said that the government is able, in certain cases, to bring charges involving international criminality in the U.S. judicial system using the RICO Act. The Court wrote that RICO is one of the rare and powerful statutes that allow for this kind of extraterritorial jurisdiction. To learn more about the RICO Act and how it is used to prosecute crimes, keep reading.

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J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

Most employers understand that if there are problems with workplace safety they could face some serious and potentially expensive consequences. Injuries to employees can lead to higher workers’ compensation premiums, money spent on litigation and, should the Occupational Safety and Health Administration catch wind of the trouble, serious fines and other enforcement action. Additionally, employers can suffer serious reputational damage, among both employees and customers, if workers suffer harm due to lapses in workplace safety.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers : I was found not guilty of a charge, but my record still shows the charge

Today marks the start of the Supreme Court’s new term. Last year was a remarkable year, with important decisions touching on issues such as healthcare, gay marriage and privacy rights. This year appears to be no less interesting; with the court announcing that it would hear a range of controversial cases including ones on abortion rights and affirmative action. Amidst the more attention-getting cases, there are others of equal importance, including a very interesting one in the criminal realm about just how seriously the Sixth Amendment ought to be taken.