Articles Tagged with social media

Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What am I obligated to do if I’ve been pulled for Drinking and Driving?”

In today’s society, it is not uncommon to turn on the news or open any social media platform and see a video of someone’s interaction with the police. The ever-present fear of police misconduct can create the sense of need to record police interactions. These types of recordings can be helpful in determining what happened between police and a suspect or individual. With a recording, no one can lie about what was said or misconstrue the actions of another because there is video evidence present. Of course, a video cannot show everything, and legally resolving any issues can take more evidence than a minute long video of one aspect of an altercation. Nevertheless, videos hold police accountable for their actions, as well as the individuals interacting with the police. Is recording a police officer legal, though? Do you have to inform the officers that you are recording them? The answer is: It depends.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear North Carolina’s law that bans registered sex offenders from using or even accessing any social media that allows those under 18 to post, which includes Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and more.

Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

The “People You May Know” section on Facebook is one of those love-it-or-hate-it features. Like so many other aspects of social media in an age where the law recognizes almost all social platform information as public domain, the friend suggestion tool raises privacy concerns for some people. Facebook essentially advertises your social media presence to people you are not—and perhaps for good reason—already friends with.

J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Should I talk to the police?”

The internet has made many things easier, whether it’s searching for information, ordering clothes or wasting time watching movies. Though most of these are positive innovations, not everything that the internet touches improves. One thing that has become frighteningly easy thanks to the internet and the abundance of social media is stalking. Obsessed individuals have a nearly limitless number of ways to not only gather information about their victims, but to threaten and harass them as well.

J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Should I talk to the police?”

When most people think of detective work, they think of a scene out of Law & Order, with police officers kicking in doors or interviewing witnesses. While that’s certainly true in some cases, detectives are forced to adapt to and keep up with rapid technological change as much as those in any other industry. Detective work today happens online and, more specifically, on social media sites with more regularity than many people imagine. This access to the internet and to social media websites can prove incredibly useful to officers in some cases and frustrating in others.