Articles Tagged with criminal record

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question:”What is an expungement?”

We have previously discussed a new law that takes effect in North Carolina on December 1, 2017. The measure deals with expungements and aims to streamline the process, making everything easier and faster for those looking to clean their record. Though we have discussed the existence of the new law and what it hopes to achieve, we have not yet spent time delving into details about the kinds of crimes that are eligible under the new expungement law. For more information about that, keep reading.

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J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

Government leaders in Asheville, North Carolina have followed those throughout other cities and states across the country in “banning the box”. Ashville joins six other North Carolina local governments in deciding to remove criminal history questions form their job applications. The move is an important one for those in western North Carolina and, more broadly, for prospective employees with criminal histories across the country who may now be more likely to receive a fair shake when applying for work.

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J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question: “What is an expungement?”

Today was a big day for those advocating change to harsh criminal laws that allow young offenders to be charged in the adult criminal justice system. Currently, New York and North Carolina are the only two states in the country where 16 and 17-year-olds are automatically prosecuted as adults. Though this still remains true, New York took a huge step to rectifying some of the problems caused by trying juveniles as adults.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?

Marijuana legalization is a concept that went from seemingly impossible to near mainstream in the span of only a few years. Washington and Colorado were among the early movers that have paved the way for other states who are now taking the plunge. Oregon, though not the first to abolish legal consequences for growing, possessing and buying marijuana, has taken a step ahead of other states by tackling the issue of criminal records of those with marijuana-related crimes.