Articles Posted in Criminal Defense Technology

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

As technology improves, it’s all but guaranteed that some enterprising criminal will find new ways to perpetrate crimes. After all, where there’s a will, it won’t be long until there’s a way. Though technological advancement has proven useful for those perpetrating crimes, it’s proven to be even more of a boon for those investigating criminal matters. Police have stayed several steps ahead of the courts, taking advantage of ambiguities in the law to use technology for their benefit.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

We’ve discussed before the impact that technology can and will continue to have when it comes to criminal investigations. Just recently, police in Arkansas made use of an Amazon Echo to contradict the story of a suspect whose friend was found dead in his home. Police have far more sources of information and evidence than ever before, something that could have a real impact on future criminal investigations.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “When can I post on Social media about my ongoing case?”

The news that prosecutors have asked Amazon to release data from its Echo personal assistant grabbed headlines across the country this past week. The tech industry has been abuzz with one of the industry leaders embroiled in a dispute with law enforcement. Privacy advocates have been alarmed by the effort to further invade a person’s home, a formerly sacred space. Finally, the law enforcement community is up in arms, arguing that if information exists which could solve a murder it should be brought to light to assist victims rather than protected to help suspects.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

If you’ve ever tried to buy tickets to a concert or other popular live event you understand the frustration felt by many. It can be downright impossible to get tickets to especially hot performances and the reason seldom has to do with other fans. Instead, automated ticketing purchasing software, known as “bots”, frequently scoop up huge numbers of tickets before few if any real people get the chance to buy. This leads to dramatically inflated prices with the bots reselling these tickets on the secondary market. It’s a deal that’s bad for fans and also bad for venues and the artists who aren’t getting the benefit of the higher prices being charged on the secondary market. Everyone, except the bots, lose.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Am I allowed to videotape an interaction with police? Can they make me stop filming?”

Most people assume that if they’ve never been arrested and charged with a crime, there’s no way their personal information would be inside a criminal database. After all, as the name implies, criminal databases collect information about and concerning crimes and criminals, not ordinary citizens. Though it’s certainly understandable why you might assume that, you’d be wrong. As reported in a recent piece by NPR, law enforcement agencies across the country have amassed a collection of images of 50 percent of Americans’ faces. How did they get them and what are they doing with them? To find out, keep reading.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Am I allowed to videotape an interaction with police? Can they make me stop filming?”

Whether you’re an avid catcher of Pikachus or are convinced the era of technology taking over is upon us, you’ve no doubt noticed Pokémon’s rather public reentrance into society lately. Advocates have lauded Pokémon Go’s ability to get gamers off the couch and moving…and get them moving it has. Some have walked straight into varying degrees of trouble with the law, including one man with an open warrant for his arrest who wandered by his local police station to battle his creatures there. Other reports have fallen more on the crime fighting side—two Go players helped catch a man wanted for attempted murder, and one woman found a dead body in her Pokémon Go meanderings.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “I was found not guilty of a charge, buy my record still shows the charge. What is going on?”

Most people would instinctively assume that secretly recording a woman wearing a skirt from below would qualify as some kind of crime. The act is undoubtedly inappropriate, disturbing and invasive. Though these things would appear to indicate criminal activity, a recent appeals court in Georgia confirmed that, at least in that state, taking such “upskirt” videos is not illegal.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

It’s something you may never have thought about: what impact does slow motion video have on your perception of an event? Your first reaction may be, nothing. After all, slow motion is just a helpful way of understanding what happened without losing details in a blur of activity. Though that sounds like a reasonable response, researchers indicate it isn’t true. A recent study showed that watching footage in slow motion can skew the viewer’s perception of the event, allowing them to infer intention where they might not have otherwise.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Am I allowed to videotape an interaction with police? Can they make me stop filming?”

North Carolina now joins the ranks of other states attempting to block the release of potentially inflammatory body camera footage. Earlier this month the governor, Pat McCrory, signed a bill into law that prevents law enforcement recordings, either from body cameras or dashboard cameras, from being released, except with very narrow exceptions. Though some officers have cheered the news, many other groups, including the ACLU and the state’s attorney general have offered criticism, saying the new law makes it harder to hold law enforcement accountable in the event of the use of excessive force.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

For pop culture junkies the Taylor Swift/Kanye West feud dates back a long way, to 2009, to be precise. It was then that Kanye stormed the MTV VMA stage, interrupting Swift’s acceptance speech. The episode garnered tremendous media attention, an outpouring of support for Taylor and scorn for Kanye. The two stars have had several run-ins since, with Swift penning a few thinly-veiled songs about Kanye and Kanye continuing to court controversy.