Articles Tagged with criminal defense lawyer

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Should I talk to the police?”

As technology improves, it’s all but guaranteed that some enterprising criminal will find new ways to perpetrate crimes. After all, where there’s a will, it won’t be long until there’s a way. Though technological advancement has proven useful for those perpetrating crimes, it’s proven to be even more of a boon for those investigating criminal matters. Police have stayed several steps ahead of the courts, taking advantage of ambiguities in the law to use technology for their benefit.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

You’ve heard it a million times before, someone who may be in a bit of hot water says they’re going to “plead the Fifth”. It’s happened most recently with President Trump’s former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn. The Senate Intelligence Committee asked him to come and testify about issues relating to his connections with Russia and it was just revealed that Flynn will be pleading the Fifth, refusing to testify to the Committee or turn over any documents related to the issue. So what exactly does it mean to plead the Fifth and how does it work? To learn more, keep reading.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

When the Utah jury acquitted a man named Roberto Román of first-degree murder of an officer of the peace, Román and his attorney breathed sighs of relief.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What should parents tell their children to do when interacting with police officers?”

If you’ve been following the news closely you’ve likely seen articles about a recent rash of clown sightings. The stories have popped up everywhere, in North Carolina, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ohio and many other places, including some international sightings. Though little has been reported in the way of harm, the reports of clowns roaming around late at night has been enough to unsettle many people, assuming that there must be a sinister motivation.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Am I allowed to videotape an interaction with police? Can they make me stop filming?”

Hate crime legislation is designed to protect those who are victims of discrimination or violence perpetrated by others. The laws are written to provide this protection to groups based on ethnic, religious and, in some cases, gender or sexual orientation grounds. This means that should a person be attacked specifically because of his or her religion or national origin, the law would treat that attack differently than if religion or national origin had not been a factor, usually by increasing penalties.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

On this blog earlier in the year we talked about the FBI trying to force Apple to hack into the San Bernardino shooting suspect’s iPhone to help with the ongoing criminal investigation. Since then the topic of the governments’ rights to access password-protected information has exploded as a conversation piece as other cases have emerged. To date, law enforcement has succeeded in paying hackers to break into the San Bernardino phone and, in another case, jailed a defendant for seven months running for refusing to provide his password to unlock his hard drive in the ongoing criminal investigation against him.

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J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Should I talk to the police?”

Though Donald Trump has had no shortage of press attention over the past few months, a special frenzy has begun recently over claims that the Republican presidential candidate is inciting violence against protesters, using fiery rhetoric to agitate his loyal supporters. One of several examples critics point to is what happened at a rally in Fayetteville, North Carolina, when a 78-year-old attendee sucker punched a young protester in the face.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question “If I have an outstanding warrant, what should I do?”

Given the current Powerball fever, it’s fitting that a former lottery winner in North Carolina is in the news. Conventional wisdom says that those who win the lotto eventually fritter the money away, buying new houses, cars, taking expensive vacations or giving money away as gifts to eager (or greedy) relatives. Marie Holmes, the North Carolina woman who won a $188 million Powerball drawing last February, has taken a different approach: spending a substantial amount of her new money paying to keep her boyfriend, Lamar “Hot Sauce” McDow, out of jail.

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Charlotte DWI Lawyer Brad Smith answers : I was found not guilty of a charge, but my record still shows the charge

Today marks the start of the Supreme Court’s new term. Last year was a remarkable year, with important decisions touching on issues such as healthcare, gay marriage and privacy rights. This year appears to be no less interesting; with the court announcing that it would hear a range of controversial cases including ones on abortion rights and affirmative action. Amidst the more attention-getting cases, there are others of equal importance, including a very interesting one in the criminal realm about just how seriously the Sixth Amendment ought to be taken.

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Charlotte DWI and Criminal Defense Attorney J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Can the police search my car without a warrant?”

When the U.S. Open tennis tournament concluded last weekend in New York, one of the tournament’s major storylines had nothing to do anything that happened on a tennis court.  Retired tennis player James Blake, once ranked No. 4 in the world, was leaning on a column in front of the Grand Hyatt hotel in New York when he was rushed by undercover police officer James Frascatore and forced to the ground.