Articles Tagged with criminal defense attorney

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question:”What is an expungement?”

We have previously discussed a new law that takes effect in North Carolina on December 1, 2017. The measure deals with expungements and aims to streamline the process, making everything easier and faster for those looking to clean their record. Though we have discussed the existence of the new law and what it hopes to achieve, we have not yet spent time delving into details about the kinds of crimes that are eligible under the new expungement law. For more information about that, keep reading.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question:”What is an expungement?”

Starting December 1, 2017, a new North Carolina law will make the path to the expungement of non-violent criminal convictions significantly shorter and easier for individuals hoping for a clean slate. The wait time for qualifying felony and misdemeanor convictions will be considerably shortened, and the current restrictions on the number of dismissed or not guilty charges will be lifted creating an exciting opportunity for qualifying residents of the Charlotte and Lake Norman area.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What are the long term effects of being convicted of a crime?”

Bank robbery is very good demonstration of the maxim that crime very rarely pays off. Studies have shown that you might be able to make off with a few thousand dollars (at most, most bank robberies don’t even result in a large haul), but your chances of getting caught are extremely high. Once you’re caught, the money disappears, you’re forced to pay for a criminal defense attorney and then, depending on the facts, you may get slapped with serious penalties, including jail time. The upside is minimal, the downside is tremendous. That’s by design, the aim of the criminal justice system is to dissuade criminal acts. But what if the upside were higher? What if a criminal was able to profit from a crime? Is that even possible? To learn more about what happens if you try and make crime pay, keep reading.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Am I allowed to videotape an interaction with police? Can they make me stop filming?”

A recent incident in Wilmington highlighted an area of legal uncertainty. The case involved an Uber-driving criminal defense attorney, a smartphone and an irritated police officer. Though this particular dispute was resolved with a public apology by the Wilmington Police Department, it begs bigger questions about how other similar incidents might be handled in the future, especially if a case were to make its way to court. To learn more about the legal issues surrounding recording police officers in North Carolina, keep reading.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

When most people think about their last interaction with a police officer it almost always involves a traffic stop. A person was speeding or not wearing a seat belt or ran a red light or was talking on a cellphone and a cop does what cops do and pulls the person over. This traffic stop can serve as a window to other, potentially more serious things. For instance, the cop could use the traffic infraction as an excuse to investigate other, potentially unrelated, crimes. In some especially tragic instances, the traffic stop can prove deadly, with officers engaging in violence.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

Lots of juicy television police procedurals spend time showing what goes on during jury deliberations. The deliberations often make for good television because of the interest people have in what goes on behind the scenes, a space usually out of view to most people. It’s fun to imagine what real jurors have to say to one another, something that in the real world, criminal defendants don’t have the luxury of knowing. The reason for the interest is that in almost all cases, a jury’s deliberations are meant to be secret.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “I was found not guilty of a charge, buy my record still shows the charge. What is going on?”

Most people would instinctively assume that secretly recording a woman wearing a skirt from below would qualify as some kind of crime. The act is undoubtedly inappropriate, disturbing and invasive. Though these things would appear to indicate criminal activity, a recent appeals court in Georgia confirmed that, at least in that state, taking such “upskirt” videos is not illegal.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “If I am charged by campus police could I still face jail time or probation?”

The “Ban the Box” movement appears to be picking up steam across the country as more and more states pass measures aimed at removing a hurdle that often discourages those with criminal records from even trying to find work. President Obama has now waded into the issue, moving on the federal level to end the practice of pre-screening for previous criminal infractions. Advocates of “Ban the Box” measures are celebrating the victory, though believe much work remains to be done before those with criminal records truly have a fair shot at finding gainful employment.

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Brad Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Should I talk to the police?”

Normally when a person stands accused of committing a crime, he or she seeks out a skilled criminal defense attorney to help prepare the strongest defense possible. The goal is to rely on the lawyer’s legal expertise to ensure you achieve the best resolution possible. Curiously, some defendants appear to be more interested in pursuing a bizarre and unsuccessful approach, known as the “Moorish defense”. To find out more, keep reading.

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J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Should I ever plead guilty to a charge?”

The axiom that “The truth shall set you free” is, in my opinion, a bit overused and often used out of context. The quote—from the eighth chapter of the Gospel according to John, in the New Testament of the Bible—is quite specific in its meaning.