Articles Tagged with assault

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question:”What is an expungement?”

Most people do not spend time worrying about things like the discovery process. It is legalistic and confusing to those not familiar with the criminal justice system. Though it can be complicated, it is incredibly important and worth understanding. Discovery is meant to shed light on evidence, creating transparency in a justice system that can, at times, be troublingly opaque. As a recent article in the New York Times demonstrates, the discovery process can sometimes go wrong and, when it does, it can have serious consequences.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “What is the difference between a misdemeanor and a felony?”

When most people think of hate crimes they imagine criminal acts that occur because one person was motivated by a particular animus against the victim. This animus can be based on a number of things, such as the victim’s race, gender or sexual orientation. If such animosity motivates a crime, it stands to reason that the defendant could be charged with committing a hate crime. However, as a case in West Virginia demonstrates, that might not always be true.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Can I be arrested without evidence against me?”

The “People You May Know” section on Facebook is one of those love-it-or-hate-it features. Like so many other aspects of social media in an age where the law recognizes almost all social platform information as public domain, the friend suggestion tool raises privacy concerns for some people. Facebook essentially advertises your social media presence to people you are not—and perhaps for good reason—already friends with.

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Charlotte Criminal Lawyer Brad Smith answers the question: “Am I allowed to videotape an interaction with police? Can they make me stop filming?”

Hate crime legislation is designed to protect those who are victims of discrimination or violence perpetrated by others. The laws are written to provide this protection to groups based on ethnic, religious and, in some cases, gender or sexual orientation grounds. This means that should a person be attacked specifically because of his or her religion or national origin, the law would treat that attack differently than if religion or national origin had not been a factor, usually by increasing penalties.

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J. Bradley Smith of Arnold & Smith, PLLC answers the question “Should I talk to the police?”

Though Donald Trump has had no shortage of press attention over the past few months, a special frenzy has begun recently over claims that the Republican presidential candidate is inciting violence against protesters, using fiery rhetoric to agitate his loyal supporters. One of several examples critics point to is what happened at a rally in Fayetteville, North Carolina, when a 78-year-old attendee sucker punched a young protester in the face.